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will start with violence in egypt. bret stephens and peter beinart disagree as usual. >>> then, is america overregulated? does the government have altogether too much of a say in how we live our lives? i'll ask the man who put many of the obama administration's regulations in place, cass c sunstein. >>> also underneath the violence, is the arab world the new start-up society? that's what an american venture capitalist believes. and while we're at innovation, is north korea going to beat apple at its own game? obviously no, but i will explain. >>> but first, here's my take. if there is one crisis that both the american left and right agree is real, it is of declining mobility. the american dream is at heart that someone no matter his or her background can make it in this country. a few weeks ago, four economists at harvard and the university of california at berkeley released a path-breaking study of mobility within the united states. and last week, the "journal of economic perspectives" published a series of essays tackling the question from an international perspective. the research is ca
in my power to make sure this law works as it's supposed to. because in the united states of america, health insurance isn't a privilege, it's your right. and we're going to keep it that way. >> the number one concern of americans is obamacare. >> obama and the democrats have turned the american people, particularly when it comes to health care, into servants of government. >> the american people wanted health care reform because they wanted affordable care. and what we're seeing under this health care law is that the cost of care is actually going up. >> because in the united states of america, health insurance isn't a privilege, it's your right. >> there are many conservatives standing up and saying, look, obamacare is going to be a disaster for the country. >> because in the united states of america, health insurance isn't a privilege, it's your right. >> as i travel around kentucky and around the country, people come up to me and say stand firm, stand up, try to stop this monstrosity, it's going to be bad for the country. >> i can tell you there was a popular physician at my town
story is an only in america story and it is an amazing tale of entrepreneurship. you don't want to miss this. then, a big question that affects us all. for the first time in history, a majority of human beings now live in cities. what does that mean? more skryscrapers and congest 8? more detroits? we will look at the upsides and the downsides of an ever more urban world. we have a terrific panel that has some surprising ideas. >>> also les miserables. it turns out that the book by victor hugo is the all-time favorite novel of a middle eastern leader that the west counts as an enemy. i will explain. but first here's my take. we are watching a season of discontent in the world of young democracies. from egypt to turkey to brazil, protests, marches and, of course, one coup. as we watch the turbulence around the globe, i think about our own democratic journey and how interesting it is that the distinctive feature of the american system is not how democratic it is but rather how undemocratic it is. hear me out. we have three co-equal branches of government and the one with the final say on m
the nation. 1963od with dr. king in when he called on america to be true to its principles. five years later, dr. king stood without me in the sanitation workers of local 1733 demanded justice, dignity and respect. the journey for civil rights, workers rights and economic rights began almost in the moment america was born. it gained new momentum on these steps 50 years ago. it advances whenever the disenfranchised and disillusioned standup, fight back and march forward. because our struggle continues, we come to this but mario not only to commemorate -- this memorial, not only to commemorate the past, but to shape the future. we have a power to carry determination, hope and passion of the march on washington forward. we must also have the courage. when must also have the courage. in the name of dr. king, a philip randolph, bayard rustin, john lewis. on behalf of those whose names will never be known. we must recommit to the struggle as stewards of a nation that belongs to the rich and the poor , to the ceo and the sanitation worker, those with and those without. we have the responsibility to
their government for redress, and to awaken america's long-slumbering conscience. we rightly and best remember dr. king's soaring oratory that day, how he gave mighty voice to the quiet hopes of millions, how he offered a salvation path for oppressed and oppressors alike. his words belong to the ages possessing a power and prophesy unmatched in our time. but we would do well to recall that day itself also belonged to those ordinary people whose named never appeared in the history books, never got on tv. many had gone to segregated schools and sat at segregated lunch counters. they lived in towns where they couldn't vote and cities where their votes didn't matter. there were couples in love who couldn't marry, soldiers who fought for freedom abroad that they found denied to them at home. they had seen loved ones beaten and children fire hosed, and they had every reason to lash out in anger or resign themselves to a bitter fate. and yet they chose a different path. in the face of hatred, they prayed for their tormenters. in the face of violence, they stood up and sat in with the moral force of nonv
and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis, and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to know dr. king. i met him in 1958 when i was 18. but i first heard of him when i was 15 years old in the 10th grade. we worked together. we marched together. we got arrested together in selma, alabama. >> have you ever heard this story before? >> yes, i have. >> you have? >> i watched it on tv. >> you did? >> so you know about the sit-ins? the freedom ride? >> yeah. >> people marching for the right to vote? you know, i was on the march from selma to montgomery. i was beaten. on march 7th, 1965, a group of us, about 600 people, black and white, many young people, some people who had just left church, decided to march from
. when women succeed, america succeeds. when people of color succeed, america succeeds. he would also want us to be fighting for voting rights. certainly we must pass a bill in the congress to correct what the supreme court did, but we must also be sure that every person who is eligible to vote can vote and that their vote would be counted. when i was here 50 years ago, people said -- and that includes voting rights for the district of columbia. when i was here 50 years ago people say, what do you remember most? and the music is playing, so i'll say this. dr. king said this 50 years ago, the music of the march, the harmony of the civil rights movement, the notes of dr. king's inspirational words must continue to inspire us to compose as dr. king said on that august afternoon a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. are you ready to beat the drum for that beautiful symphony of brotherhood? are you ready to realize the dream? thank you all very much. >> that was representative nancy pelosi. she has represented california's 12th district for more than 25 years. she is, of course, the first w
.vitac.com >>> tonight, pot in america. >> i think its deserves some respect, so i always call it cannabis. >> the biggest cash crop in the u.s. should it be legal? should it be taxed? is it a gateway drug that leads to addiction. >> without question, i think legalizing marijuana would be a huge mistake. >> taking you to the front lines of the battle, the beverly hills woman that said lighting up makes them better moms. >> i feel like i'm more interactive with my children. >> and i ask dr. sanjay gupta how dangerous is it really? >> every 19 minutes someone dies of prescription drug overdose but doesn't happen with marijuana. >> and what really happens inside a medical dispensary. >> the clinic is run like a typical health clinic. it's beautiful inside. >> this is the special report gone to pot, america's marijuana obsession. >>> good evening. the fight over pot grows, so does the use. recently washington d.c. opened the first medical marijuana dispensary, with other states that legalized it more medical uses. should it be a crime? we'll take a closer look tonight. >>> also, dr. sanjay gup
in america." and also, about the sale of the "washington post." >> 2008 campaign was a campaign about hope and change, and an aspiration that barack obama gave to people that then he tried to fulfill. one of the reasons i called this book "collission 2012" was there was the america that voted in 2008 for barack obama, and there was the america that voted voten 2010 to bring republicans into power in the house, and the question was this was a clash between those two americas. >> rose: we conclude this evening with hugh laurie, the star of house, who has a new album, a blues albull called "didn't it rain." >> it's an extraordinary physical pleasure to me-- well, to everyone. this is a thing i keep thinking about with acting. acting is an intriguing and absorbing problem, but at the end of the day, after a hard day at work, nobody goes home and relaxes by doing a bit of acting. >> rose: same thing, yes. >> whereas with music, everybody-- no matter what their job is, it is probably one of the most common experiences. it's as common as sitting around the fire. >> rose: dan balz and hugh laurie
-of-the-europeans, for instance, theirability to influence that is limited. and the social function much america's diminishing influence throughout the middle east. one of the reasons the gulf states radio angry with the united states not only because of what happened today in egypt. it's because they see the president is weak on iran, weak on syria and israeli settlements and now they feel -- >> all of the leff village gone. >> and now they are stepping in and they have the means to do it. >> thank you both very much. >> thank you. >> online we have a map that shows where all u.s. military aid guess. still to come on "the news hour," al-jazeera america has its debut. same sex marriage in the states. the dolphins day at the white house. and lyme disease on the rise. first the eerp news of the day. >> pakistan's former president the some point in time be was smrmt there to -- weep have a report narrated by john gla armed personnel were stationed around the courthouse. this was not a moment that mush would treasure. he seemed reluctant to get out of his vehicle. but the country's former military ruler had littl
is a reflection of where america stands right now. according to a reuters poll, only 25% would support a military intervention. 45% oppose it, 49% don't know enough to answer. so dell, what is the objective of any military strike by the u.s.? the u.s. on record for more than a year calling for the assad regime to go but if this were to go forward, the objective would be to suppress the ability to deliver councilmember a call weapons and nothing more. >> you are now in washington and i was there yesterday and one of the things that is curious to the american public is we think all of washington is talking about syria and egypt. the truth of the matter is what they are talking about and i had a feeling yesterday that it was about back-to-school sales? >> yes, if you are going to do something in the rush hour, do it in late day and out of rush hour. the talk on the sunday shows today, largely about syria but also about the martin martin luther king anniversary as well. there doesn't seem to be a lot of focus and the principle point i should make here is congress has been out the last five weeks. the
everybody here this fourthth animal america arab month of separation and it's my pleasure to join us here and many of us know that we are such a lucky city, and we are lucky because people around their world make their way to fraction, find hopey until the city they know that we celebrate our diversity and find strength in the different cultures that pretend together and now, i ask you also to bring me talent from the arab america communities to make me and help me lune run the city. yes, it's incredible. union, i think i can talk about how wonderful diversity is, but we have to get the talent from our communities to represent all of the different thing that we do in the city. and you know, tonight, even though there is something called a baseball game out there, but these wonderful events that we have in the city whether it's america's cup whether it's fleet week, whether it's the 49ers playing or the giants playing, even eventually when we land the superbowl it all board of trustees all of us, i know that what i'm doing as a mayor and making sure that i support smallbitions in the cit
food but other service jobs overseas. >> the complaint is that we don'have jobs here in america. but the fact is labor is cheaper overseas. and youth unemployment here. minimum wage jobs in mcdonalds and entw level position are necessary for high school and college students to get a to the in the work force. if you start raising thatcost and making them more expensive, emplees willot hiring then. there is a 17 percent youth unemployment rate. we'll see go up. >> hold on, ju know. your city alone, there is a walmart law where they want to increase the wage for walmart. there is a 34 percent unemployment rate in teens in washington d.c. and you box them outine more from jobs th need. >> wait a second, if you are talking about mcdonald, the average worker is 28. not teenagers. and second eric y and wayne will have to get in corporate jets to go to mcdonald and send those jobs overseas. that's what wayne is saying. >> no, let's be honest here. one more thing eric, you want us to bring third world wages. >> what are you talking about. >>y corporate jet was built overseas. >> there w
to work. how would dr. king see the current racial situation in america? >> it took guts to do that then. and it's going to take guts to finish the job now. >> it is the collapse of the traditional family that is wreaking havoc in the african-american community. >> i stand here today in this sacred place in my father's footsteps. >> the other issue is racial profile acvoter identification requirements. while somewhat important are essentially a sideshow, a sideshow. a sideshow. >> stand tall in your community. fight for diversity. understand its strength. >> sideshow. >> you've got to stand up, speak up, speak out. and get in the way! make some noise! >> and i don't think our society will rise to its full maturity until we come to see that the men are made to live together as brothers. >> sideshow. if dr. king were alive today, i believe he would be brokenhearted about what has happened to the traditional famil family. >> good to have you with us tonight. thanks for watching "the ed show" right here 5:00 monday through friday. chris matthews is at 7:00. stick around to watch his show. bi
in households across america. the summons ignited a movement to make real the promise of democracy. of course everyone knows the "i had a dream" speech, but the fierce urgency of now part of it was not only an inspiration, it was a motivation to act. was not the first time dr. martin luther king jr. urged fellow travelers to reject the status quo, to in his words at the march, refuse to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. seven years early now to trim of in francisco, my hometown, 1956, dr. king delivered the same message to the delegates of the naacp convention. --said "now i realize those all over are telling us we must slow up, he said, but we cannot afford this slow up. we have a moral obligation to press on because of our love for america and our love for the democratic way of life, we must keep moving. in san francisco in 1956 to the mall in 1963 to america today, dr. king's message endures. we must keep moving. our heritage and our hope. advancing civil or voting rights. within two years after the march, there would be a historic civil rights act and a voting rights act. that is
changed america. >> his words belong to the ages. possessing a power and prove if i unmatched in our time. >> i have a dream. >> they opened minds. they melted hearts. >> we must keep the faith and keep our eyes on the prize. >> that was the spirit of young people like john lewis brought to that day. >> and america is that promised land for all of us. >> in the face of violence, they stood up and sat in. >> because they kept marching. america changed. >> and yes, eventually the white house changed. >> free at last, free at last. thank god almighty, we are free at last. >> good to have you with us tonight. thanks for watching. i'm ed schultz. "the ed show." we're here monday through friday 5:00 eastern. today was a big day of emotion for this country. a day of record, a day of reflection. to me, you know what, i am so feeling so good about inside is because i think today was a day of learning for a lot of americans. there are a lot of american who's weren't alive 50 years ago today that kind of wondered what this was all about. and the neat thing about it all is that you can't change the f
is jonathan betz, and i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. i started in a small television station in rural arkansas. it's a part of the country that often gets overlooked. but there are a lot of fascinating people there, a lot of fascinating stories there. i like that al jazeera will pay attention to those kinds of places. what drew me to journalism is i like the idea that we are documenting history. al jazeera documents it like none other. and to be a journalist, and to be part of a team like that? that's an incredible blessing. what happens when social media uncovers unheard and fascinating news stories? >> they share it on a stream. would probably be very good at that also. that is it for al-jazeera america. ♪ schwartz: martyn stacey has also been campaigning for tighter controls on adventure tour operators. schwartz: ballooning may appear to be the gentlest of extreme sports but this is a four tonne aircraft with more power than many a light plane and no brakes. a pilot can take the craft up or down but direction is determined by the wind. martyn stacey: "
as highly discriminatory. what politicians decide to do about it but putting corporate america in a tough spot. an article in the new yorker this week titled "why the olympic sponsors should take action on gay rights." richard is a political strategist and gay rights advocate. bob zito is with us and he helped shape the brands of sony, new york stock exchange, bristol-myers squib. you write the participation of corporate sponsors mostly benefits the russian government. it's not required for american athletes to succeed. they sign deals before president putin signed that law. what do you think these corporate sponsors need to do now? >> i think the point is, right, that no one wants to penalize the athletes who worked so hard to succeed and most people believe we should participant. the corporate sponsors because they donate sod much money to the games, that they have earned the right to insist that russia comply with the policies that these corporations, most of these corporations have for their own employees of non-discrimination. i think that they have a lot of -- they have the power of
. >> (inaudible) this is so obama's america. concerned moms and dads reacted angry on line and they should. there was a campaign against the a d. jc penney released the at the same time our intent was not to trivialize bullying. we are committed to have a range of styles for kids to express individuality and did that while punching a baby in the face. yes, a baby. you know who doesn't need friends? dogs who play fetch by themselves. ♪ that is really out. but you know it is really lonely. after all of that, welcome to the program. would you call reaction to the a d over reaction or underreaction or perhaps an avcaddo. >> i don't so it at all. they take me on a shopping spre in jc penney and i never seen the clots and things i neverine opened and they have interesting clothes going on there. >> i love jc penney and some of the mannequins are alluring and many times i am escorted out after perhaps on on >> how do you have rom on on room in your apartment for those mannequins. >> when i dress them like guests on redeye. >> oh, no. >> you should see the terry mannequin. someone who is often
.s. aid, and an alliance that is one of america east most important in the middle east. and authorities have arrested mohammed badie. separately judicial officials say a court will review a petition to release, hosni mubarak. mubarak is waiting to be retried on charges of being behind the killi killings that take place. >>> and demonstrators waved flags and posters of ousted president, morsi. egypt's cabinet says more than 850 civilians have been killed in the last week. the muslim brotherhood puts the toll much higher. let's begin in washington with mike viqueira. mike what is the latest on the meeting with the president and his national security team? >> well that meeting broke up just a short time ago, tony. we don't yet have a readout. we know egypt was certainly tops on the agenda. what to do about u.s. aid that is still blowing after the chaos, killing and carnage. under mounting pressure to halt payments to egypt, today a flat denial from the white house that aid has already been cut off. >> this is not just a faucet in which you turn the spigot. whether tranches of aid have gone
welcome t to al jazeera america. president obama considers cutting aid egypt after weeks oh of bloodshed. billions is on the line. burning up, more than 50 wild fires out of control this wes in states and they are running out of resources. >> in bangladesh, how put americans are putting lives in danger. >> we begin in egypt. the violent and bloody change of government there. the u.s. is rethinking its relationship, powerful mideast allie. president obama met with his security advisors today about possibly cutting the billions of aid to egypt. the same time the white house is condemning accusations by turkey's prime minister that israel had a hand in the overthrow of president morsi. we are watching developments in washington but first this report from jane ferguson. >> reporter: anti-military retestprotests in egypt has cha. they replace the demonstrations. here, around a thousand people gathered around the migathered . >> translator: i'm here to say no with an open chest. i know there are murders from the army and thugs with the police at any moment but i am standing here s
, ginger, thank you. >>> we do move on this evening to what could be a turning point for america and our involvement in syria. tonight, violent new clashes erupting right where the alleged chemical weapons attacks took place this week. and this evening a haunting new number. one million children without homes, some of them ripped from their parents. that's the equivalent of all the children and boston and lls combined. tonight it's what the president is now saying about those attacks that signals america might soon be involved. martha raddatz on the region on what it was the president said. >> reporter: these are the images that have had the white house huddled in marathon meetings. the suspected chemical attack, syrian women, children, estimates ranging upward of 1,000 killed. >> what we've seen indicates this is clearly a big event of grave concern. >> reporter: speaking to cnn, the president raising the stakes. >> that starts getting to some core national interests that the united states has. >>eporter: syria's chaos. its chemical weapons and its breeding of terror, a threat to the en
. >> we are a hair away from large scale hunger, starvation across america. >> this is fox news reporting the great food stamp binge, i'm reporting from the u.s. department of agriculture, why the usda? well for historical and political reasons, food stamps fall under the agriculture department domain, in fact, food stamps will cost taxpayers a staggering $78 million in year. indeed, food stamps and other food assistance add up to 70% of the outlay. according to a fox news poll, a majority of voters think that most of the 46 million plus food stamp recipients are taking advantage of the system and are not truly in need. you have heard stories of food stamp, waste, fraud and abuse, well this hour we will also look at the cost to the recipients and to the american character. during this show, you can share your thoughts via twitter. be sure to use #foxnewsreporting. we start in new york city where a proponent of food stamps is working to get more people signed up. >> you are watching a team of determined activists preparing their plan of action. >> the guidelines change a bit. you feel all
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their -- work hard to understand the industry you operate in. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> this is "bbc world news america", i am katty kay. edward snowden trades the transit zone for asylum in russia. ariel castro, the man who abducted three women in ohio, is sentenced to life in prison plus 1000 years. first, he tried to explain himself. he helped announce the royal baby to the world. the palacee you to foot man west become a celebrity in calcutta. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. after a month of hiding out in the transit area of a moscow airport, tonight, former nsa contractor, edward snowden, has granted a years asylum in
, and this is "your money." are we one america with two economies? america is the land of opportunity, right? >> you can choose policies that invest in our middle class and create new jobs and grow this economy so that everybody has a chance to succeed. >> that was 2008. four and a half years later, the president's supporters are wishing for a little less hope and a little more change. >> doing nothing doesn't help the middle class. >> so what's the president doing? four speeches in seven days. >> if folks in washington really want a grand bargain, how about a grand bargain for middle class jobs? >> but while washington waits for a bargain, millions of american workers feel they're getting a raw deal. fast food workers across the country who say they can't afford to live where they work, walking off the job to demand higher wages. now the economy is adding jobs, but those new jobs pay less than the ones lost during the recession. the president worries the growing income gap will fray america's social fabric. even the good news isn't as good as it seems. amazon adding 5,000 warehouse jobs. the compan
." this is "bbc world news america ." reporting from washington, i'm jane o'brien. symbolic way felt president -- zimbabwe's president robert mugabe takes on rivals. james"whitey" bulger is found guilty. and we will meet the man who made it all the way to san francisco after getting a double long transplant. -- double lung transplant. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. in his first speech since the disputed july 31st election, zimbabwe's president robert mu gabe viciously attacked his opponents, saying they can "go and hang themselves." the chargey denied but at the vote was rigged. correspondent andrew harding has this report. victory?imous in not president mugabe's style. be's style.ident muga he had this to say. those who cannot handle defeat, can go hang themselves, said mr. mugabe. yet beenly he has not sworn in for another term. his opponents insist they have proof the election was stolen. -- theefeatedmdc nationd mdc spoke of a in mourning. willhave said they challenge the entire process in court. ehe court sides with mr. mugab in such matters.
to america's reality. millions still feel like they are missing out on the recovery. so when will it be their turn? christine romans has answers. "your money" starts now. >>> the american dream, happiness and prosperity. a house, a great job, maybe a couple of kids and time to enjoy it all. the great recession is behind us, but the recovery isn't so great. i'm christine romans and this is "your money." first, housing. goldman sachs says all cash deals are half the market right now. wealthy investors, buyers from china, canada, south america, pumping up recent housing data. average americans may be getting priced out. in the second quarter, when you look at this, more than two-thirds of all the homes sold in the u.s. were affordable. for families making $56,000 a year, that's the median u.s. income. but you can see how that affordability is falling. next, the labor market. nearly 5 million net new jobs have been created near the end of the recession four years ago, but look at the jobs that were lost. mostly middle wage jobs right here, and the jobs we're creating, mostly lowe
is the history of the american people, and in that book, you write that america still is the best hope for the human race. >> yes. i think that is still true, though since i published that book, other countries have been catching up on the united states in terms of economic output, particularly communist china, and in my opinion, america will remain the top nation for the indefinite future, and the reason i say that is because of the united states is a very free country. in many wayings, the freest country in the world, and freedom means that you can interchange ideas and develop ideas and create ideas and it's ideas in the long run that keep one nation ahead of another. the ability to produce striking new ideas. i think the united states still has that capacity, and therefore, will survive as the world's top nation. >> host: well, recently, two books you published on darwin and socrates. how did darwin become charles darwin? >> guest: well, he was a man who could be his own master were the simple reason he inherited a lot of money. he came from a distinguished family of doctors and ot
. >> i explained to the officials that there were other companies already in america and brazil so that they would not achieving anything but once it was obvious they would be going, i would rather destroy then give it back or allow the courts to freeze our reporting. >> what should we make of it? i was joined by the internet campaign director randy gave us his take on the revelations from the guardian. >> we should be very worried about it. this is an escalation in the battle between privacy advocates and whistleblowers and people in the nsa here in the united states or other intelligence agencies abroad who are fighting for the future of our right to communicate in private. the fact that reduce intelligence agencies are actually willing to go as far as what they have done and destroy the hard drives of one of the most prominent newspaper errs in that country and in the western world is incredibly frightening and it really shows what we are rough against here if we believe, as we do here at free press and many of our allies in a person's right to communicate in private and rolling
sunday morning. >>> and coverage of the america's cup, the leadup to the america's cup seen here today. the finals delivered thrilling racing action, too. lawrence scott is at the america's cup park with the latest. >> reporter: this was a beautiful day in many respects, probably the best day out here thus far. the promise of this america's cup racing on the bay fully realized today. there were fans here today at america's cup park who got to see two races which is kind of a novelty because winds have been high. we seem to do a nightly wind report. right now they did get in two races today. take a look. >> reporter: with cooperating wind the finals had its first race day where both scheduled races had starts and finishes from both missed time as team new zealand is off and running. victory before the domination continued. race two unique in that it occurred and was the most competitive of the summer. emirates team new zealand is the fastest challenger and claims the second race pushing the lead of four to one leaving three more victories for a date with oracle usa. >> it was a really g
's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >>> 50 years after martin luther king junior delivered his monumental i have a dream speech, tens of thousands are in washington to commemorate that dream. some worry that the advances are in dangery of being rolled back. >> reporter: the crowds that massed in front of the lincoln mey morial didn't match the 200,000 or more who watched martin luther king at the same spot half a century ago. but their determination to see america redeem his vision was strong, as children they were at the 25th anniversary of the march and brought their own kids to the 50 year commemoration. >> there are a lot of people who still care about equity and justice in the united states and recognize we haven't made it, but we are also fighting for the same cause. >> reporter: the speakers underlined the obstacles that still hindered black
. but the media don't seem to be interested. >>> al jazeera america makes its debut. will americans buy what they're selling? >>> and if dark clouds are bothering your white house, why not bring in something sunny? >>> on the panel this week, writer and fox news contributor judy miller. syndicated columnist cal thomas contributing editor of american daily magazine and fox news contributor richard grenel. fox news is on. . >>> we can and must be more transparent. so i directed the intelligence community to make public as much information about these programs as possible. all these steps are designed to ensure that the american people can trust that our efforts are in line with our interests and our values. and to others around the world, i want to make clear, once again, that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. our focus is on finding information to protect our people and in many cases protect our allies. >> that was the president earlier this month trying to convince americans his administration is doing all it can to be transparent in regard to the nsa collection of data. thi
islamic nations. iran cut off petroleum exports to the united states. america felt it was held hostage by dependence on foreign oil. as the price of a gallon of gas passed a dollar, congress debated closing off 100 million alaskan acres to mineral exploitation. the bill would double our national park system. alaska congressman don young was outraged. how selfish and ridiculous can we be when we think we can live within ourselves? we have billions of people in asia alone, south america is suffering from starvation, and we're going to set aside 175 million acres of land for a playground that has all the minerals and oil and resources-- timber and hydropower? that's asinine! other congressmen saw the issue in more personal terms. arizona congressman mo udall. the most important thing to me is that it's there. you get a real lift from getting out of the artificial world and being with nature. not only oil lay beneath the tundra. minerals vital to national defense were being imported from the third world while unknown quantities waited in alaska. the amounts were assumed to be vast. the ala
the great progress of the past 50 years in america that allows him to be president, that how much hard work we have to come. and it will end up being a speech about economic justice, not just freedom. >> pelley: now we were looking, of course, at the black and white pictures of the day in 1963. there are a quarter of a million people, it is estimated, on the national mall on that day. certainly today there are fewer people at this eventment but a very large crowd, nonetheless here to hear, here to listen to the president who will be speaking in just another moment. the official title of the event in 1963 was the march on washington for jobs and freedom. jobs was the number one thing on that list. and the president today is expected to talk about that, that a great deal of progress has been made in terms of the rights of all americans and the legal rights of all americans. but that in terms of the economy and jobs, not enough progress has been made. it's an interesting point that about three times more african-americans live below the poverty level than white americans. and that was the same
is pictures by google's street view. the images capture sites of america where rates of poverty and unemployment are high and educational opportunities are slim. photographs from a new american picture were included in the new photography 2011 exhibition at mona in new york. and also has been seen at exhibitions at la ball in paris and pier 21 here in san francisco. a monograph was published in 2011. and it is represented by local galleries and sf galleries would like to thank steven orts and the staff for the support of this event. we asked doug to speak today in order to draw threads from his work until asketon has street view which is currently on view in the gallery. doug i will turn it over to you. >> thanks for coming. i appreciate it. i am looking forward to giving you some details on this. i have 15 minutes, so i am not going to talk about all of them. there are so many layers of consideration to this and each of these areas could sort of veer off into its own talk and so i am going to talk to some of the things that may overlap with aaron's work. and i want to go throug
." >> this is bbc world news america, reporting from washington, i am katty kay. says that if his country is attacked he will defend himself. if this happens, what kind of effect may this have? >> the horrific aftermath of an attack carried out allegedly by the syrian government using an incendiary bomb. we have this exclusive report. cuba is back in the ring after banning professional boxing for half a century. the punching is flying once again. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and across the globe. in washington, new york and london, there have been a series of tense meetings on syria. presidentt jet -- obama has briefed john boehner, and david cameron is talking to parliament. russia has called a meeting of the security council. no decision has been made but with a threat looming, president assad says that syria will defend itself. the syrian people are increasingly nervous as we report from damascus. it feels as if something big is coming to damascus. the supporters of president assad paraded on the hotel, outside of the where the u.n. inspectors and foreign c
could spark a wider conflict that disrupts oil supplies in the mideast. now america itself imports 40% of its demand and while that sounds like a lot it's the reverse of where we were in 2005 where we imported 60% from abroad. what's happened is advances after oil extracting in the gulf of mexico. now, fracking technology works by drilling deep in to rock formation, shale formations and injecting chemicals in the rock releasing oil and gas. this is controversial. they say it leases toxic gases in to the water table. earthquakes are reporting with greater freagreater frequency. all across america there is oil and gas trapped in shale. the formation in the northeast. these are two of the biggest shale plays where fracking is involved. there is more where there is conventional oil in saudi arabia. that may not last for more than a few years but the implication of this are obvious. the u.s. complicates another military adventure many to the middle east. this new domestic energy boom will fuel america's next big economic boom. already the american factories are taking a look at the natural
, in here, out there. listen, america and all the ships at sea, folks, if you watch this show -- and i hope you do -- you know that i am a proud supporter and occasional savior of the winter olympics. in 2010, the colbert nation sponsored the u.s. speedskaters who took home the gold but, folks, i'm no hero. i'm the guy who funded the hero so i'm more important than the hero. but a new crisis may force me to dust off my red, white and blue nuthugger. jim? >> the winter olympics in russia are just about six months away and there is growing controversy over new antigay laws and about the safety of gay people visiting russia. also gay athletes. >> a russian law unanimously passed in parliament allows for fines and arrests over anything deemed gay propaganda displayed in front of children. >> so how will this be enforced? does this really mean if someone was waving a rainbow flag or peacefully demonstrating or talking to young people about their life that they could be arrested? apparently yes. >> stephen: yes. russia will not tolerate the gays. now this makes sense, folks, because their preside
hosting "the doily show" america's greatest satirical lace centerpiece program. (laughter) he is eviscerating that lace work and that's a direct copy quote. our guest tonight is senator rand paul, he's going to be with us. (cheers and applause) he's also where we begin tonight. what has senator paul been up to? >> senator rand paul of kentucky heads to iowa. >> he has planned to visit south carolina and nevada. >> tomorrow he headlines a g.o.p. dinner new hampshire. >> i know rand paul, i think he'll run in 2016. >> what stands between the paul dynasty and 2016? >> well, i'll tell you the first thing that stands between them, three (bleep)ing years! (laughter) that's over 50 new iphones from now. (laughter) why are we talking about this election? that brings us to yet another installment of "can't you at least wait until jon stewart comes back?" (laughter) seriously! this is my last week doing this! it's not just that the media is already ramping up their 2016 coverage, it's this some of them are already trying to wind it down. >> i predict the hard right is going to take over
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